question about beef rib roasts and tenderloins...

Discussion in 'Beef' started by fatback, Nov 16, 2009.

  1. fatback

    fatback Fire Starter

    I know when I oven-roast prime rib and tenderloin, I pull it from the oven around 120 degrees knowing that "temp creep" will take it to a final temp around 130 while it rests -- just the way I like it. Of course, in the oven I am roasting around 300-350 degrees most of the time. Since I have not smoked many large, premium beef cuts in my smoker, and the cooking temperature will be much lower when I do -- around 225-250 -- how much "temp creep" should I expect? Obviously, I want the meat to be "done", but I can't stand carving an expensive piece of beef (usually in front of hungry guests) only to find I have cooked it past medium rare.
     
  2. erain

    erain Master of the Pit OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    on rib roasts i take them up to 130-135 deg, foil, wrap in towels and put in a cooler for 1/2 hour or til dinner time. end up with a nice med rare every time.... never did a tenderloin, too much money for a not that great tasting cut of beef, very tender but just lacks taste. take a rib roast any day.
     
  3. fatback joe

    fatback joe Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Will your smoker just not hit those temps and hold them?

    From one Fatback to another, I would say just up your temps.

    But to answer the question, yep, the carry over at lower temp cooking will be smaller than at higher temp. Just how much will depend....when you have it resting will it just be sitting on the counter wrapped in foil or sitting in a cambro staying warm? All kind of factor in, but based on what you posted, I would say plan 3 to 5 degrees at 225 to 250 in my experience.
     
  4. chef jeff tx

    chef jeff tx Smoking Fanatic

    When I do tenderloins I try to keep the smoker in the 190-200 range for about 45 mins which typically gets me an internal temp of 115 or so then I transfer the meat to a very hot grill to brown up and bring the meat up to final temp. I use this method when planning to serve the tender either hot as an entree or cold as an appetizer.
     
  5. fatback

    fatback Fire Starter

    I can definitely stoke the fire up to get higher temps in my smoker, but I thought the whole point was "low and slow". You recommend more heat and shorter duration for these cuts?
     
  6. alx

    alx Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    My experience is 5 degrees or so as well.I like to hold off on tenting the meat a few minutes to let some of the residual heat on outside dissipate and then lightly tent the meat in a cool oven.....

    Whoops sorry about posting so quick after your last question!!!
     
  7. fatback joe

    fatback joe Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Without a doubt......the whole low and slow thing is really for tougher meats that have a lot of connective tissue that takes time to break down, the cuts you mention don't need that time.

    If your smoker can hold the temp, then do it. Nothing to gain from "low and slow" on those cuts IMO.
     
  8. mballi3011

    mballi3011 Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    I have smoked a many of ribeyes and I always smoke them at 220-230 and take them too about 130 for rare and let them rest with some foil just layed over the steak and then it's enjoy. As always.
     
  9. ronp

    ronp Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Ditto on that Mark.
     
  10. oneshot

    oneshot Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mballi3011 [​IMG]
    I have smoked a many of ribeyes and I always smoke them at 220-230 and take them too about 130 for rare and let them rest with some foil just layed over the steak and then it's enjoy. As always.




    Ditto on that Ron....[​IMG]
     

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