At what temp does the plateau start and stop?

Discussion in 'Pork' started by shriv, Aug 9, 2009.

  1. shriv

    shriv Fire Starter

    What temp does the plateau start and stop? I assumed it started at 140 and stopped at 180. Is that correct? Entrophy huh? Who would have guessed you needed to understand the second law of physics to smoke!
    shriv
     
  2. oneshot

    oneshot Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

    My experiance has been it starts when it wants to and ends when it has teased you to the point of herri kerri....LOL [​IMG]
     
  3. forluvofsmoke

    forluvofsmoke Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Alot of factors can come into play, that determine the plateau's start/stop temps, and duration:

    1. The initial smoker rack temp
    2. Continued average temps
    3. Type of meat
    4. Amount of bone mass versus meat mass, or lack of bone
    5. Fat content/marbling and/or fat cap thickness
    6. Cook chamber humidity
    7. Size of the surface area of the meat/overall weight/thickness

    I've seen plateau's start between the upper 140* ranges and into the mid 150* range. Where ever it starts, it generally continues slowly through for another 10-12*, and then begins to climb more afterwards. I have noticed I/Ts that actually drop a few degrees just entering into, or after begining the stall.

    When I'm doing a smoke, I try to stretch out the plateau for tougher cuts of meat in order to help with breakdown of the connective tissues. This technique is not always easy to achieve...it's a internal temp/timing/chamber temp control issue.

    Eric
     
  4. cajunsmoke13

    cajunsmoke13 Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    I think the last one I did, it started about 152....and lasted awhile there. I just threw one on at 11:30, a small one though....Will see where I stall on this one...
     
  5. shriv

    shriv Fire Starter

    Great explaination Eric. It makes sense and and explains the herri kerri fellings too. I have a full smoker on the palteau for 12 hours between 140 and 185. I should breakthrough anytime.
    shriv
     
  6. forluvofsmoke

    forluvofsmoke Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Yeah, don't let it get under your skin...the plateau is dreaded by most. I welcome it, knowing that this is where I will get really good interior product results if it goes right. Some members here have even commented while I'm in the middle of a progressive qview, saying 'hope you make it through the stall OK', amoung other things. It'll drive ya nuts if ya let it. You'll think your temp probe has lost it's marbles or something. I don't sweat the dreaded stall.

    The plateau should be over somewhere in the lower 160* range, depending on where it started for each individual piece of meat. If you have a probe in it, and are watching it fairly closely, the temp reading will not change for (example) 8-12 minutes at a time.

    At 170* + is where it's time for pulling to foil up, if that's what you're planniing...but the meat is much closer to done at that point.

    Just be patient with it, and understand that a longer plateau means it was doing you a good job of breaking down the meat, for a more tender finished product.

    Good luck with the smoke!

    Eric
     
  7. richoso1

    richoso1 Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    My sentiments exactly. Roll with it.
     
  8. mballi3011

    mballi3011 Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    All of my plateau's have come from 0 to 195 and they start and stop on their own good and well time. So really somewhere between 150 and alittle higher or lower and they quite it dam good and ready.
     
  9. danbury

    danbury Smoking Fanatic

    Yesterday on my chuck roasts they stalled at 155 and then again at 165. after that the temperature shot up like a rocket.

    Pork butts as I recall were usually around 165.
     
  10. bbq engineer

    bbq engineer Master of the Pit OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    I always welcome the plateau, because it gives me a chance to go get another beer [​IMG]! Actually, it gives me more time to work on other projects ...and you know that beer thing!

    Don't sweat it...good things are happening!
     
  11. morkdach

    morkdach Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    well put^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    I always welcome the plateau, because it gives me a chance to go get another beer [​IMG]! Actually, it gives me more time to work on other projects ...and you know that beer thing!

    Don't sweat it...good things are happening!
    i like what he said even better beer,beer beer after a dozen or so ya just don't care.
     
  12. rivet

    rivet Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    With briskets, mine always stall at 150F like clockwork. When they un-stall is up to the individual piece of meat.
     
  13. gnubee

    gnubee Master of the Pit OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    I know that this may sound like heresy but sometimes a stall can be assisted along by giving the meat a bit of a shock like bouncing it on the counter. Also by foiling it at the point of stall.

    I suppose that it breaks down the gristle and fats far better for a more tender end product if left alone to its own devices, but sometimes you just don't have the time. ( or patience )

    The drop in temp during a stall is caused by the juices starting to move throughout the meat thus evening out the temps and causing a slight drop.
    It just means that things are happening. Its frustrating though.

    I have many times given myself an extra 4 or 5 hours to allow for the stall then have it stall even longer than that. It is at this point that Supuku seems like a reasonable solution. [​IMG]
     
  14. fire it up

    fire it up Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    I would say of allllllllll the stalls I have had they mostly occur at 147 but then if they pass that generally 154.
    Not always but that has been the average.
    Hell, had a butt one time not stall at all and she was 8# almost and was finished in 5 or 6 hours, completely to pulling 205 stage.
     
  15. shriv

    shriv Fire Starter

    I smoke at around 230 degrees. I would geuss the length of the stall will also be longer at a lower temp and shorter at a higher temp. I assume you can turn up the temp and blow through the stall resulting in less tender meat?
    shriv
     
  16. fire it up

    fire it up Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    You never want to crank the temp up to get out of a stall. The fats need time to break down properly for the meat to come out perfect and once you make it through the stall it will rise rather quickly, or at least quick compared to the 3 hours you at there watching the temp not move or even toy with you and go down a bit but just keep a steady temp and eventually you will make it through, and you will be happy you did.
     
  17. meat magician

    meat magician Smoke Blower

    For me, I've found that usually my temps rise pretty steady till around 135-150 during the first 4-5 hours of cooking (on a 6-8 lb butt) the next 2 hours (6,7) it steadies out around 155-165, my plateau, I hit 170-180 after 8-9 hours, 190 around 10 hrs ( I foil at 180 ish) usually after 11 hours I have hit 200 and then I let it rest in the cooler wraped in a towel untill it's time to eat.
     

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