Big Green Egg Medium Egg

Average User Rating:
4.25/5,
By:
Big Green Egg
  • The Medium EGG is a good size for smaller families of two to four people.•15-inch diameter cooking grid •Weighs 95 pounds •177 square inches of cooking surface •The Medium EGG can cook: ◦18-pound turkey ◦6 burgers ◦3 chickens vertically ◦4 steaks ◦4 racks of ribs vertically

Recent User Reviews

  1. perkton
    3/5,
    "Great Product but Lid is Problematic"
    Value:
    4/5,
    Quality:
    1/5,
    Ease of Use:
    5/5,
    Heat Control:
    5/5,
    Purchase Date:
    Feb 21, 2015
    Purchase Price:
    699.00
    Pros - Cooks Great. True Grill and Smoker-A BBQ Connoisseur Must Have
    Cons - Design on the Lid is a Compromise
    I had the product now for two months.  I smoked, grilled, and seared in snow and rain.  This is truly exceptional in temperature control.  High heat or low, it works great. My only complaint is the design on the lid and its accessories are not for medium egg.  Here is what happened.  I have Green Egg grill cover that has a handle on top.  So I lifted it to get cooking, and the ceramic top cover came off with the cover.  The top cover fell to the ground and cracked!  This is a bummer.  Anyway, it is my fault.  I should been more careful. 

    Today, I went to the store and purchased another ceramic cover.  I found out the medium lid is the same as the large.  I sort of known this that it is the same.  I even prompted the store clerk.  I did the interchange between large and medium with the casting iron damper, and it certainly is the same.  Subsequently, I noticed, the store's damper is also loose on the medium egg.  Large is tight.  Small is tight.  But the medium egg uses the large's accessories.  This is not right.  Well, I bought the ceramic top cover and some extra gasket replacement.  Got home, doubled up the gasket and now, I got a snug fit on the damper and ceramic top!  Cost me $48 to fix it.  It's a work around.  The store does not carry the actual gasket for the top opening--it is different from the gasket replacement but it works. 

    I understand keeping less SKU and communizing parts...I would suggest to Green Egg to have some extra thick gasket specific for medium egg but not sure over time, the gasket will compress and deteriorate.

    For what's it worth.  It is a great product.  The medium size works for my family. 
  2. bocaboy
    4/5,
    "Old timer using an old medium Big Green Egg"
    Value:
    4/5,
    Quality:
    5/5,
    Ease of Use:
    4/5,
    Heat Control:
    5/5,
    Purchase Date:
    Jan 1, 1999
    Purchase Price:
    399.00
    Pros - Excellent heat, allows for good smokey flavor
    Cons - Expensive, can't do cold smoking, sometimes hard to regulate
    I've owned a medium Big Green Egg for about 13 years. I hadn't used it lately, but now that I've formally retired, I decided to rebuild the Egg and start smokin'! First, I needed to realign the bands for the lid as well as replace the stainless steel grid. I had also lost the ash rake (no big deal, really) and the wooden handle needed to be replaced because it had rotted off. In addition, the old trolley's wheels are frozen, so moving this puppy from one place to another requires a bit of ingenuity. My next project will be to replace the wheels, but they are frozen in place so I need to strategize how to get the old ones off. I also purchased a plate setter to offset the heat. This accessory wasn't available when I first bought my Egg, but I immediately knew what the benefits would be and found a local dealer who had one in stock.

    I'm a particular fan of doing fish in the BGE. I love to smoke blue fish or mackerel, both of which are difficult to find in Florida. As I write this, I'm doing Jeff's 3-2-1 recipe for ribs to get my feet wet after all this time.

    I'm very interested in other smokers and would love to start experimenting with cold smoking for fish, sausages and cheese. I'd be interested to hear any feedback on the Bradley 4-rack smoker that's being used for this purpose.

    I discovered this site by a Google search, and I'm delighted that there's such a valuable resource on the Internet. Thanks, Jeff, for starting and maintaining this site. I hope to be a new contributor!
  3. 3dogs10legs
    5/5,
    "My Medium Big Green Egg"
    Value:
    4/5,
    Quality:
    5/5,
    Ease of Use:
    3/5,
    Heat Control:
    5/5,
    Pros - High Quality
    Cons - So Far So Good
    I have only had my BGE for a short time. My main smoker is a WSM, I got the egg mostly for my winter smokes as the WSM loses a lot of heat in sub freezing weather. So far I am very happy with the BGE.

User Comments

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  1. gglz
    Hello, I have a large BGE. I know what you mean about the ceramic lid cover for BGE not fitting tight. I purchased their BGE stainless steal damper chimney with a gasket that you stick around the top for a tight fit, no need to use ceramic cover or the cast iron top again. Cost was $60 dollars CDN. Cheers, Gerry.
  2. goodtobeking
    bocaboy I started using the Amazing Products Pellet Smoker last week and while it was previously challenging keeping temps at 80 -110 - I can now truely cold smoke ( for up to 12 hours) at whatever the outside temperature is before I light the coal to finish the cooking/smoking process. Did cheese and then salmon and halibut this weekend! Awesome!
  3. bocaboy
    Goodtobeking, I'll try this recipe later this week. It sounds excellent! For the record, I do the same thing with my fire that you do. I use a fire starter cube to start the fire as I don't have a torch, and also scatter the wood. I'll report back on how it comes out!!
  4. goodtobeking
    Bocaboy here is my brine recipe. I just use lump charcoal filled to the top of the first ring in the big green egg. Light a small area of charcoal in the middle with my gas torch. I suround the area I lit with 3 -5 seasoned cherry branches about 6" long so as the fire expands you get continuous smoke. No need to soak even if you use chips.
    Brine:
    1.5 gallon water
    2 cups course ground sea salt (non-iodized)
    2 pounds dark brown sugar 1 capful pure vanilla
    1.5 cup Yoshida gourmet sauce
    1 cup pure maple syrup
    1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
    4 tablespoons chopped garlic
    ¼ cup Franks Red hot sauce
    Brine 72 hours, rinse, dry with paper towels
    Leave in fridge overnight on racks to allow it to form pellicle
    Smoke 3 hours at 125 – 130 F
    Increase temp to 175 – 180F for 2 more hours
    Use turkey baster to remove fat buildup in pan below rack
  5. sandlapper
  6. sandlapper
    I have been using the Bradley for a few more years than you have had the BGE!! I really like it an dif you are in Fl. you will not likely have the problems of the Bradley in more Northern climes- the Bradley hass onl a 500 watt heating element and as such often will not reach a satoafactory cooking temp when the wind blows or durin gWinter even here in the middle of the state in SC. Cold smoking however won't be a problem- in doing that the Bradley has only the biscuit burner working so that the smoke can be generated. I have the original 4 rack and I have a 6 rack digital which I don't think adds much to the original. I have had very little problem- I have replaced the biscuit burner and the gasket on the oven door. My digital has had to have the digital timer replaced after about 5 years of use on the original. The Bradley is light, easily portable if needed and relaible and the folk in the technical dept at Bradley are great in helping solve problems. I would give it a 4+ out of 5
  7. bocaboy
    I wanted to report back that I used the BGE to smoke a couple mackerel and bluefish and they were outstanding! I created my own brine with salt, brown sugar, onion powder and a couple secret ingredients and only soaked them for 4 hours, and the result was fantastic. They were cooked whole, head on. I followed Goodtobeking's suggestion and started out at 150-165˚, slowly increasing it to 220˚. I used a handful of applewood thrown directly on top of the coals. Total time spent smoking was just short of 2 hours. The fish was moist and full of smokey flavor, a big hit with the family!
  8. bordercollie
    I have had a Bradley but after replacing the expensive smoke generators 2x , temperature problems and a few other things , I looked at the other cabinet style electric smokers. I looked at the cost of replacement parts, the element rating in watts, and build quality and was drawn to a Smokin it brand. I am very happy with the quality and reasonable cost of replacement parts should I need them. I haven't smoked at a low temperature with it yet but plan to for the holidays. The shelves are strong and the grease drains on a sloped floor to a stainless slide in container below. Priced from 299-499 depending on size.
  9. sandlapper
    I have used a Bradley 4 rack smoker for maybe 15 years or so and find it particularly useful in smoking fish- I do mostly Salmon or Tuna- I haven't tried bluefish . The only problem I have had with my Bradley is burnout of the heating element that burns the wood- It was easily replaced with a new part from Bradley. I also have 6 rack digital smoker which has not lived up to expectations. It recently burned out the digital control unit and a replacement was fairly expensive. I have also found it impossible to get either unit to a temp over 200 degrees if the ambient temp is lower then about 60 degrees. Winding some house insulation around the unit helps, and some have added another 500 W heating element- I don't have the electrical skills to do that! The frustration I had with my digital Bradley led me to a Cookshack and with that one I am so far most pleased!! It has many advantages Bradley doesn't have but also is considerably more expensive. All in all I would say my Bradleys have been faithful workhorses with a few minor inconveniences.
    I also had a large BGE- a tree fell on it and cracked the case! INsurance would not reimburse me for the damage!
  10. bocaboy
    It was great to read your comments about the BGE. Can you share what your brine recipe? I'd also like to ask how you handle your wood on the fire. Do you soak the wood first? Are you using a wood box or just throwing it on the fire? Also, if you're using such low temps, are you still filling the firebox full at the start?