Wine cooler conversion?

Discussion in 'Smoker Builds' started by grumpysmoke, Dec 27, 2015.

  1. So I "inherited" this wine cooler.




    And I am thinking it might make a great cold smoker using an AMNPS with a few modifications.

    The interior walls are steel so no worry about plastics.

    Obviously I need an intake and outlet for the air supply, but other than that, I am flying blind.

    Have all winter long to build it and want to make it right (hate not being able to cold smoke during our Texas summers) LOL

    Any ideas, suggestions, questions, foreseeable problems or....?

    Thank you all in advance.

    Love this forum.

    Grumpy

    Correction, The inside walls are plastic.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2015
  2. mr t 59874

    mr t 59874 Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

    Very nice inheritance, nothing like a cold, cold smoker.

    Consider using an external smoke application such as a MB mod or something similar.  It will allow you to introduce much cleaner smoke with less creosote to your cooler than if you put your AMNPS inside.  If you operate it in the cooling mode, it may be necessary to push a small amount of air to the cooler in order to get airflow.  A simple aquarium air pump would most likely be sufficient.

    T
     
  3. Great Idea Mr T.

    Been reading up on MB Mods and am considering something similar to Pops.


    I am concerned, however, about drilling a 3" hole. Will have to be careful to avoid cooling coils.

    Also proper air circulation/draft as this unit cools to 45 degrees.

    Not sure if an aquarium pump will work.

    What about adding an exhaust vent on top that is able to accommodate a small fan to draw smoke up and out?
     
  4. mr t 59874

    mr t 59874 Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

    Yes you will have to watch for the coils.  Cut through the shell, then search for the coils.  If you add some moisture to the inside before turning it on, you might be able to get an idea as to where they are located by looking at the walls for moisture collection.

    1. You shouldn't need a lot of air flow.  Consider placing the air near the AMNPS (near the bottom of the door where your air intake will be located) to give it air and push the smoke through the MB.  Place it near the bottom as we want to collect the creosote deposits near the top of the MB.  Also the longer the run between the MB and the product cooler, the cooler and cleaner your smoke will be, mine is 10ft.
    My Cold Smoking Options w/Q - View

    You will need a top vent but, a fan shouldn't be necessary.

    T
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2015
  5. Well, I have been reading up a lot on cold smoking and am starting to get scared off.

    The unit I have only goes to a low temp of 45f degrees.

    According to everything that I have read that is in the danger zone.

    Also, the interior walls are plastic, not metal as I originally thought.

    I have cold smoked cheese using my Mini-WSM on cold days never letting inside temp to go above 90f and it has always come out good.

    I guess I cold just use this exclusively for cheese, but I was wanting to do bacon, salmon, etc.

    If I cured the meats before smoking them I suppose that would work, however, now I am not sure of the temp range.

    Is 45f to cold to adequately smoke cured meats?

    May just leave this a a beer fridge, lol.
     
  6. mr t 59874

    mr t 59874 Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

    If you made the MB mod you would find that your cheese will be much better to the point that you could consume it right out of the smoker without the bitter taste. 90
    If you make the MB mod conversion you would find much better results with your cheese to the point that you could consume it directly out of the smoker without the bitter taste. 90° is way high for cheese, consider pulling it at 70°-75°.  With the cooler it would not be a problem.

    If your meats are properly cured, you don't need to worry about the danger zone. Yes 45° would smoke cured meats.

    Go for it. [​IMG]



    T
     

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