tenderquick cure: amounts and times per pound (wet and dry)

Discussion in 'Curing' started by tasunkawitko, Dec 18, 2011.

  1. tasunkawitko

    tasunkawitko Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    g'morning, folks -

    i had this information down, but seem to have misplaced it. i can't check the bag, because it was torn long ago and the tenderquick itself ended up in a ziplock bag.

    [​IMG]

    what i need is:

    a) the amount of tenderquick needed for curing with a dry cure per pound of meat, and the time for curing per inch of thickness.

    b) the amount of tenderquick needed for curing with a brine cure per pound of meat, and the time for curing per inch of thickness.

    thanks in advance -

    ron
     
  2. grampyskids

    grampyskids Meat Mopper SMF Premier Member

    All the info is on their website. . mortonsalt.com.

    Here goes: 1TBS per ponnd of meat for 4-8 hours.

    Brining: 1C to 4 Cups of water for 24 hours.

    Good Luck
     
  3. tasunkawitko

    tasunkawitko Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    hey, thanks grampyskids - i've been looking around on their site all morning, but haven't been able to find it. i used to be good at this internet stuff, but i guess technology has passed me by!

    the meat i'll be using wil be whole cuts, 1-2 inches thick, so i'll see how this works - thanks!
     
  4. tasunkawitko

    tasunkawitko Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    very nice resource, fpnf - thanks!
     
  5. smokinal

    smokinal Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    What you gonna cure TW?
     
  6. boykjo

    boykjo Sausage maker Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member

    If your going to wet brine cure I went 1/4 cup of tenderquick to 2 cups of water which will be 50% less cure to water than the recommended ammount. The meat was too salty to me with the directions on the bag....Just a heads up

    Joe
     
  7. tasunkawitko

    tasunkawitko Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    I've got a lot of ideas, all with venison - some new and some i've tried before but need tweaking:

    Romanian pastramă (not pastrami)

    "dry beef" (some call it chipped beef)

    ground venison maple bacon

    pepperoni, bologna and salami
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2011
  8. smokinal

    smokinal Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    Can't wait to see what you come up with.
     
  9. doctord1955

    doctord1955 Smoking Fanatic

    Has anyone ever noticed or thought that TQ seems to change flavor as it sits in freezer.  It seemed to me that it loses flavor or something!  maybe its just me!
     
  10. sprky

    sprky Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    OK i have a bag of Morton's Tender Quick in my hand. Wanted to post a pic but naturally batteries are dead.

    The following info is taken right from the bag.

    Tender Quick is a blend of the finest quality salt, sugar and meat curing ingredients. It is perfectly blended for fast cure action and improved flavor and color of the meats. 

    Curing Meats In Your Kitchen

    Use fresh or completely thawed frozen meat that is clean and chilled to 36-40 degrees Fahrenheit internal temperature. Pork chops, spare ribs, chicken and other small cuts of meat can be cured with 1/2 ounce(1 tablespoon) of Tender Quick cure per pound of meat. Rub cure into meat thoroughly then place in clean bag and tie securely. Store in refrigerator at 36-40 degrees Fahrenheit for 4-8 hours hours to cure. Rinse just prior to cooking. For brine curing, dissolve 1 cup Tender Quick cure in 4 cups of water. Place meat in brine, refrigerator and allow to cure for 24 hours. For pumping pickle, follow proportions for brine curing.

    Ideal for dry curing, brine curing, and making a pumping pickle. Follow recipe directions carefully. Cook meat before eating. 
     
  11. venture

    venture Smoking Guru OTBS Member

  12. tasunkawitko

    tasunkawitko Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    great onfo, guys - thanks for posting.

    i think i have it all figured out except when it comes to the brine cure. it seem to me (and i could be wrong) that shooter rick's formula is for dry curing. at the same time, it also seems to me that the 24 hours recommended on the tq bag for brine curing might not be adequate for thicker cuts. anyone have any advice or thoughts when it comes to this?

    thanks!
     
  13. teeznuts

    teeznuts Master of the Pit

    Print this and glue it to your ziplock [​IMG]

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  14. tasunkawitko

    tasunkawitko Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    good one, teez!

    thanks to all - based on the information i have gleaned from various sources, here's the "primer" that i have assembled. if anyone can fill in any blanks and/or spot any major errors, please let me know:

     
  15. venture

    venture Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    The dry cure time for whole meat cuts of two to three inch thickness would be closer to 4 to 6 days as I calculate it.  Two inch cut is one inch from center. One inch is 4 quarters or 4 days based on Shooters formula.  I simplify the calculation by going 2 days for each inch of thickness.  Math works out the same.  These are minimum times and a couple days extra for safety doesn't hurt.  Thick cuts, you get into injections and the brine cure may be preferred?

    Good luck and good smoking.
     
  16. tasunkawitko

    tasunkawitko Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    agreed, venture - in fact, on one site they recommend a combination of injecting and brine-curing, especially if there is any bone involved. the recommendation is to inject along the bone, especially at the ends of the bone.
     
  17. venture

    venture Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Yes, if I inject cure, I prefer to brine. For cuts two to three inches thick, I use a dry cure because it saves room in the fridge.  No dedicated fridge here.[​IMG]

    Good luck and good smoking.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2011




  18. I dry cure whole cuts up to 3 inches thick for 2 1/2 days per inch of height.

    Anything more than 3" or with bone, I combination cure.

    I mix 1/3 of the required cure with a little water and inject, rub on the rest.

    I've never found a good reason to brine cure.
     

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