Smoked Salmon

Discussion in 'Fish' started by bryce, Apr 25, 2015.

  1. dirtsailor2003

    dirtsailor2003 Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Bryce nice first smoke with that chief. You won't be able to lower the heat until you swap out that burner. Honestly I like to ramp the heat up when I smoke fish. Starting around 130. Then each hour increase 10 degrees until the fish hits 145, or the smoker hits 180. Then I leave it there until the fish hits 145.
     
  2. bryce

    bryce Smoking Fanatic

    Thanks guys. Things are still going well. Fish still smoking but I snagged  little piece (some of the ends are very done) and decided I don't really like Sockeye. It has almost a citrusy taste to it. I'm just a king/steelhead guy.
     
  3. waterinholebrew

    waterinholebrew Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Thanks Tom, appreciate that !
     
  4. mr t 59874

    mr t 59874 Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

    You will find that using different times and temps will depend on the desired finished product.  Some prefer a moist end product while others lean toward a drier jerky type or anything in between.  You will find you're own and go with it.

    T
     
  5. bryce

    bryce Smoking Fanatic

    Went and snagged another couple of pieces. Mr. T's brine is great and imparts a good flavor for salmon. Combined with Alder it worked out really well.

    Thanks for hooking me up with the recipe Mr. T!

    Bryce
     
  6. mr t 59874

    mr t 59874 Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

    You are welcome.  You will find the brine and procedure will work very well with the King salmon, my favorite also.

    T
     
  7. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Bryce, afternoon....... Next batch, think about leaving the skin on.... most of the fat, the good stuff, is between the skin and the meat....

    Did you use lemon or some other citrus in the brine ????? I've eaten a lot of sockeye and citrus is one taste I haven't noticed.....

    Dave
     
  8. bryce

    bryce Smoking Fanatic

    Thanks Dave. No, no lemon or citrus at all. Kind of stumping my wife and I. We just figured it was the salmon but now I'm wondering if it the wood I've been using either the brand or apple. The brine was money as I even tasted it prior to brining the fish a couple different times.

    What wood do you use?

    Bryce
     
  9. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Alder only on salmon.... Maybe the smoker needed breaking in.... smoke it for a day or so to get it cruddy black inside..... racks too... spray them with Pam so the fish don't stick..

    Was your dish soap a lemon scented soap ???? PSSSS..... I NEVER wash or clean a smoker.... not even the racks.... Just heat it up to kill all the "bugs" and call it good.....
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2015
  10. mr t 59874

    mr t 59874 Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

    Couldn't agree more Dave.  Hell, I had to grab my sunglasses to read his cheese thread.  [​IMG]   Who has more fun than smokers?  [​IMG]

    He'll be teaching us before long at this rate.

    T
     
  11. dirtsailor2003

    dirtsailor2003 Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Alder is my favorite for salmon too.


    It's what we use for the fire line at the Depoe Bay Salmon Bake.
     
  12. bryce

    bryce Smoking Fanatic

    LOLOLOL!!! sunglasses...[​IMG]  It is pretty shiny huh.

    It got a little dirty today though!
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2015
  13. bryce

    bryce Smoking Fanatic

    That's bad to the bone man. The original way of cooking salmon.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2015
  14. mr t 59874

    mr t 59874 Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

    Perfect DS, wonder if I could talk my wife into putting that on the deck?

    T
     
  15. cmayna

    cmayna Master of the Pit OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Want 200?   No you don't, not for fish.  Yes when it comes to filet's,  keep the skin on.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2015
  16. bryce

    bryce Smoking Fanatic

    I'll have to try skin on. The mud line in some fish always bugged me so I went no skin most of the time.

    Bryce
     
  17. cmayna

    cmayna Master of the Pit OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Here I preach with skin, yet today I'm doing a bunch of Salmon nuggets without skin.   It's all in size of the pieces to me but also if it's finger food such as jerky and nuggets you don't want to be picking off the small pieces of skin when trying to woof down multiple pieces of such yumminess.   For wood, I start out with Alder and then finish with apple.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2015
  18. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member


    That "mud line" is natural fats... depends what the fish eats that gives it flavor... In salmon, it is omega fatty acids which are heart healthy... I find the salmon from Oregon have a much finer flavor than those from Washington, Puget Sound.. I think it's due to Oregon salmon eating squid and sardines... If you have never had troll caught Oregon King salmon, you are missing something special...
     
  19. cmayna

    cmayna Master of the Pit OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Personally, I think we west coasters should meet somewhere along the mid Oregon coast (Depoe Bay)  for a Salmon session and compare our smoking notes.  Better yet, bring our smokers or smoked products.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2015
  20. mr t 59874

    mr t 59874 Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

     Clarifying my procedure.  When smoke cooking salmon, the salmon is placed in a cold smoker (Cookshack 066) set at 200°.  The 200° temperature setting ensures the wood begins to smoke as the smoker begins to warm.  I really can't say that the internal smoker temp ever reaches 200° before the fish internal temp reaches 140°, usually within 45 minutes.  At this time, the smoker automatically goes to a 140° hold temperature.  At this time, the carryover temp will take the fish to 145° for the desired 30-minute rest.

    Hope this clarifies my procedure.  I did add the clarification to the thread.  Mr T's "Smoked Salmon From Go to Show" w/Q-View

    Tom
    Yes, leave the skin on.  By doing so, it helps to keep the flesh from breaking.  The skin can easily be removed after the cook, if desired.

    Tom
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2015

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