Smoked Dino Ribs

Discussion in 'Grilling Beef' started by bagbeard, Nov 26, 2013.

  1. Getting into this winter weather smoking thing. 

    decided to smoke some texas cut beef ribs, or dino ribs.

    used the trusty weber with smokenator .  rubbed with my own memphis style rib rub and smoked with cherry and hickory.  cooked at around 225 - 250 for 5 hours.  foil tent for 15 minutes then chow down!

    the outside temp was -7C or 19F.





     
  2. dirtsailor2003

    dirtsailor2003 Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Ribs Look Great!!! I set up my smoker next to our outdoor fireplace this time of year too!!!!
     
  3. foamheart

    foamheart Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Nice looking dinos!

    I guess I am just strange, when I have lived elsewhere in the world in cooler climates, I love the outside when its cold. An outdoor fire to sit next to, with a hot toddy, exhaling vapors...... Its so invigorating! I really loved it.

    I am guessing its why I si enjoy smoking and grilling in the winter months.

    Excellent ribs ........ I am guessing that between bites there was some serious smiles if you could catch 'em in a hurry....LOL

    Great job.
     
  4. rabbithutch

    rabbithutch Master of the Pit OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    And here I thought the chiminea was a Tex Mex thing!

    I like the looks of yours. It almost looks like an angry, 3-eyed dragon's face.

    :sausage:
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2013
  5. chimineas are popular here for people in the city who want a fire on there patio.  i was given this thing years ago and never used it till last year.  i dont really need to use one as i can have fires in my yard , but the fire pit is to far from my patio.

    not very efficient, but after about 3 hours, really kicks heat. will hold a regular woodstove log.  i sit and dream of mods as i smoke meat.
     
  6. rabbithutch

    rabbithutch Master of the Pit OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Yes, the beauty of a chimnea is the build up of heat in the ceramics and the gradual release which follows. Although I rarely need one here in central Texas, I do use mine occasionally to provide radiating heat overnight for potted plants on the patio. When freezes threaten, we cover the plants; but I sometimes build a fire before dark and keep it stoked until bedtime. The chimnea is NOT covered, but it radiates enough heat to make a critical difference in cold damage to plants.
     

Share This Page