smoke time needed

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by jbfromtennessee, Oct 11, 2015.

  1. jbfromtennessee

    jbfromtennessee Fire Starter

    sorry, wrong forum for my question. will try again.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2015
  2. cliffcarter

    cliffcarter Master of the Pit Group Lead OTBS Member

    Post it here, no one will mind.
     
  3. jbfromtennessee

    jbfromtennessee Fire Starter

    ok, thanks, don't know if i am asking this correctly or not but i wanting to know at what point do you no longer need smoke on a pork shoulder. i use charcoal for heat, normally 220-240 degrees, and add hickory chips to create a light blue smoke. 
     
  4. cliffcarter

    cliffcarter Master of the Pit Group Lead OTBS Member

    That's a personal preference. I use chunks not chips, I arrange them so that I get smoke for about half the cook. This gives me a smoke flavor that I like.YMMV.
     
  5. jbfromtennessee

    jbfromtennessee Fire Starter

    thanks cliff, i actually use chunks after i get the coals to settle down.  i had heard somewhere that after the first 3-4 hours the pours close up basically not needing smoke any longer. i think i will go for awhile longer since it takes 10-12 hours to get done. i guess a trial and error kinda thing. i appreciate your input. jb
     
  6. chef jimmyj

    chef jimmyj Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member

    Last edited: Oct 11, 2015
  7. stickyfingers

    stickyfingers Smoking Fanatic

    2-4 hours depending on preference.
     
  8. garyhibbert

    garyhibbert Smoking Guru OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    I put smoke to mine from the time it goes on the smoker right to the time I foil it.  Like JJ said, most of the smoke flavor goes onto the outside and then gets mixed in when you pull the meat.  I like to let it sit in an ``airtight`` container overnight to let the smoke flavor mix throughout the pulled pork.  That`s how Miss Linda and I like it, but as said, that`s just us.

    Gary
     
  9. So many variations to the smoke flavor. Different types and quality the of wood, amount of moisture in the wood, length of time in the smoke, all make for substantial and subtle differences in the overall flavor. I constantly experiment with different combination of woods, some well recognized and used often, others more obscure. It all comes down to personal preference. Experiment and you'll find combinations that work well for you.

    Most of all, have fun!!!
     
  10. garyhibbert

    garyhibbert Smoking Guru OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    Hey JJ.  Just followed that link and read the post.  That was bang on.  [​IMG]         Far as I`m concerned, it`s a smoker---therefor it should smoke!!!

    Otherwise, I`ll just use the oven.

    Gary
     

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