Prime rib advice

Discussion in 'Beef' started by rad5, Nov 24, 2009.

  1. rad5

    rad5 Newbie

    I picked up a prime rib at Costco to smoke for Thanksgiving. This is my first rib, any suggestions as to what wood to use, seasoning, smoking time?
     
  2. mr mac

    mr mac Smoking Fanatic

    I smoked my last prime rib at 200* over cherry for about two hours and pulled it when it reached 125* and allowed it to rest for 15 minutes before slicing. I used my standard rub recipe of brown sugar, salt, cumin, chili powder, onion and garlic powder, dry mustard and smoked paprika. Once sliced I got my grill as hot as it would get (around 500*) and seared my slice after adding a wee more salt and pepper. The Mrs. dipped hers in an au jus.
     
  3. I coat the prime rib with a mixture of Turbinado Sugar, Kosher Salt, Smoked Paprika, Cracked Black Pepper, and a slight dose of cayenne pepper

    I put the prime rib in the smoker at 250 degrees and cook it to 135 degrees internal. It takes approx 20 minutes per pound to cook it in this fashion.

    If I am cooking a single roast I wrap it in foil, if I am cooking large amounts I drop the roasts in a clean ice chest to rest for 10 minutes or so.

    If I am cooking large amounts I cut whole primes into thirds----because there is many people that request "end pieces"
     
  4. pineywoods

    pineywoods Smoking Guru Staff Member Administrator Group Lead SMF Premier Member

    I keep it simple coat with some evoo salt pepper garlic then into a 225 degree smoker until they hit 138-140 then rest about 20 minutes. I like cherry wood
     
  5. If you want to add an extra step that totally rocks your smokey flavor, you can slice it then flame grill for about 3 minutes per side. The grill marks add a good visual and it sears the meat well. That's my favorite method after smoking to 120 internal. I use white or red oak.
     
  6. rad5

    rad5 Newbie

    Thanks guys, I was thinking of using a sweeter wood like cherry or apple. I like the idea of a simple rub, I want the flavor of the meat to come through.
     
  7. pineywoods

    pineywoods Smoking Guru Staff Member Administrator Group Lead SMF Premier Member

    Thats my thoughts exactly I want the taste of the meat to come through thats why I keep the spices simple. Same with the smoke I feel cherry compliments the meat without over powering it.
     
  8. ronp

    ronp Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Exactly what Jerry said.
     
  9. rad5

    rad5 Newbie

    Should I put the meat in cold or let it come up to room temp before going in the smoker.
     
  10. uncle_lar

    uncle_lar Smoking Fanatic OTBS Member

    if you have time to let it sit for awhile thats fine
    but fridge temp is ok too.
    like said above, minimal spice t bring out the flavor of the meat.
    I like a combination of apple and cherry. 200* til 130*
    put apn with some beef broth and onions below it ti catch the drippings
    then make your ajue from that. you cant go wrong
     
  11. pineywoods

    pineywoods Smoking Guru Staff Member Administrator Group Lead SMF Premier Member

    Personally I put them in cold remember that time sitting out to get to room temp is counting against your 40-140 safety rule
     
  12. rad5

    rad5 Newbie

    So here's what I did.... pretty simple actually. I seasoned the rib with salt, fresh cracked pepper, garlic powder, onion powder and a little olive oil. I put in the smoker fat side up and smoked it at 250-260 using cherry wood. I pulled it out at 135which took about 2.5 hrs. I then let it rest for about 15-20min. I checked the temp again and it wasn't quite 140.

    It would have been perfect for my taste, but I knew my guests liked their meat more medium so I put in the oven that was already set at 400 cooking the acorn squash. I let is sit in the oven for about 15 min uncovered and let it rest again another 15 min.

    Sorry I did not get any pics but that meat looked and tasted great! Just the right amount of season and smoke flavor. I thought it complimented the meat perfect without over powering the flavor of the meat.
     

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