Please help with measuring Cure # 1 for Jerky

Discussion in 'Making Jerky' started by kryinggame, Sep 21, 2012.

  1. kryinggame

    kryinggame Smoking Fanatic

    I'm going to try something different. Normally, I use Hi Country dry seasoning to make beef jerky but I find the mixture to salty and bland.

    I want to make jerky using a wet solution. Earlier today I scored 1 pound of Cure # 1. The problem is, I'm not sure of the correct measurement to use.

    For each pound of beef jerky, how much cure # 1 should I use?

    I really would like guidance from those who are experienced with cure #1--safety first.

    Thank you!
     
  2. mike johnson

    mike johnson Master of the Pit Group Lead OTBS Member

    when making sausage its 1 tsp. for 5 lb. of meat not sure about jerky though
     
  3. kryinggame

    kryinggame Smoking Fanatic

    Yeah...Ive posted about Jerky not sausage but thank you...[​IMG]
     
  4. s2k9k

    s2k9k AMNPS Test Group

    I've only smoked jerky a couple of times but I read a ton of threads for recipes before I did, I just checked my notes and I used 1 tsp for 5 lbs of raw meat and both times it came out just fine!
     
  5. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    For bacon, a 120 Ppm nitrite is the max allowed in a brine or pumped solution....    So we will figure that would be OK for beef jerky.... 10-20% less would be OK too...  remember 120 is the max....  

    Weight of the meat and weight of the water in grams..... 1 pound equals 454 grams....  

    Lets figure 1# meat and 1# water....  = 908 grams.... at 120 Ppm nitrite... 908 X .000120 = 0.109 grams nitrite

    Cure #1 is 6.25% nitrite so.....   0.109 grams / 0.0625 = 1.75 grams of Cure #1 added to 2 pounds water and meat or 908 grams water and meat will give you a 120 Ppm cure after equilibrium takes place.... thinly sliced meat in the solution stored in the refrigerator for a couple days should be fine.....  You can also add spices, salt, sugar or what every your liking to the brine/cure mix..... those additions will add to the weight of your water solution for the original calculation...    

    Anyway, that is the "correct way to do it"....  like laboratory stuff way to do it....  Once you understand what, when, why and how, you are good to go in the future.....    Dave
     
  6. s2k9k

    s2k9k AMNPS Test Group

    So what does that mean in tsp? since most of us don't have a gram scale! (guess I need to find a good one)
     
  7. In that example, 1.75 grams of Cure#1 is needed.

    A level half tsp. of Cure#1 is ~2.5 grams.

    1.75/2.5=.70

    So, a level 1/4 tsp. plus a level 1/8 tsp. would be 3/4 or .75 of the 1/2 tsp. which is plenty close enough.

    HTH


    Cheers, peace and bacon grease,
    ~Martin

    [​IMG]

    [COLOR=#black]Click here to check out the Universal Cure Calculator!!!!![/COLOR]
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2012
  8. s2k9k

    s2k9k AMNPS Test Group

    So the answer to the OP's question would be 3/4 of 1/2 tsp, correct?

    And me using 1 tsp to 5 lbs meat and using 1/2 gallon water would be ok?

    Just trying to learn here!
     
  9. If you're going to make good and safe cured meat, that is a must have.

    I use a marinate on mine and stick with 1 level tsp or 2.5 g per 5# raw meat (2.26 kg).
     
  10. Only if he uses one pound of meat to a pound of liquid, the 3/8 of a tsp. applies to that particular scenario only, that particular amount of meat and liquid,
    If the meat or liquid amount changes, the cure amount will change.

    re: 1 tsp to 5 lbs meat and using 1/2 gallon water
    1 tsp of cure#1 isn't enough for 5 lbs. of meat and that much water.

    Take a look at the examples in the following thread to better understand it.
    http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/124590/universal-cure-calculator/20

    Cheers, peace and bacon grease,
    ~Martin

    [​IMG]

    [COLOR=#black]Click here to check out the Universal Cure Calculator!!!!![/COLOR]
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2012
  11. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

     
  12. An easy way to do it would be to use the 1:1 ratio and the 120 ppm as above. 5 lbs. of meat to 5 lbs. of liquid.

    We know that we need 3/8 of a tsp. of Cure #1 per pound of meat and pound of liquid.

    So, 3/8 X 5 = 15/8 or 1-7/8 tsp of cure#1 for 5 lbs. of meat and 5 lbs. of liquid.

    HTH

    Cheers, peace and bacon grease,
    ~Martin

    [​IMG]

    [COLOR=#black]Click here to check out the Universal Cure Calculator!!!!![/COLOR]
     
  13. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Martin... While cruzing through the web, folks have different weights for the same cure #1 when measured by volume..... Do you know if Cure #1 weighs different from different manufacturers ????   I have cure #1 from 2 different sources...  Sausage Maker and Butcher Packer.... when and if I think of it, I will do a test....    Dave
     
  14. They should be near exactly the same.
    1 tsp. of cure #1 per 5 lbs. of meat corresponding to 156ppm nitrite is the accepted rule of thumb, regardless of the manufacturer.
    Having said that and as you know, using weights is the best way to go.

    I should also say that 5 g. of cure#1 per tsp. is an approximation. it can never be exact, heck, measuring spoons vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, I've seen tablespoons vary by a 1/4 tsp or more!!!

    As long as you're close, that's fine, things don't have to be exact....standard brine curing and salt box curing are never exact.
    However, the smaller the amounts you're working with, the more important it is to be accurate, that's why all home curers should be using an accurate and reliable scale.

    HTH

    Cheers, peace and bacon grease,
    ~Martin

    [​IMG]

    [COLOR=#black]Click here to check out the Universal Cure Calculator!!!!![/COLOR]
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2012
  15. mossymo

    mossymo Master of the Pit OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Weight is the most accurate measurement of cure. Having a scale is the safest practice, too much cure can give a toxic/deadly nitrate overdose and too little can inhibit bacteria growth which will lead to botulism poisoning.

    I am not trying to sound like a preacher on this, but when curing food with nitrate do the research and know what you are doing. Food safety needs to be most important for you, family and friends who will be eating your tasty, smoked meats. This is the reason premixed/ store bought seasonings are so popular.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2012
  16. kryinggame

    kryinggame Smoking Fanatic

    Guys, thanks for the detailed responses but I'm a bit confused.

    According to the calculator provided by Martin, my 2lbs of beef is equal to 907.18 grams.  Based upon this, I will need 2.26 grams of cure # 1.

    From what was posted earlier, 1/2tsp = 2.25 grams.  So can I conclude that I need 1/2 tsp for my 2lbs of beef?

    Also, you gents mentioned a ratio of water. I've never seen a recipe for jerky that includes water.

    Am I missing something?  Thanks all!
     
  17. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Kryinggame, morning.... Looking at your first post and your last post, I thought you wanted to make a brine/cure solution for your jerky... 

    I guess we (the responders to your thread) are missing something...    Sorry for the confusion...  Dave
     
  18. kryinggame

    kryinggame Smoking Fanatic

    Morning all,

    Dave I apologize if I wasn't clear.
    When I said wet solution in my original posting, I meant a combination of sauces (teriyaki , soy sauce, etc.) . Normally, use use a dry Solution, such as made by hi country.

    I hope this clarifies my question. Thank you for your insight.
     

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