Old Country BBQ Pits Wrangler Smoker Review

Discussion in 'Wood Smokers' started by lphamilton1, Jun 2, 2013.

  1. glocksrock

    glocksrock Smoking Fanatic

    I don't think you can do better for the money. But the pecos is bigger and cheaper, so long as you don't mind it being a bit thinner steel.
     
  2. jburn244

    jburn244 Fire Starter

    The size is the draw to the Pecos, I'm curious whether there's any legitimate  concerns about the thinner gauge steel not holding heat well or warping. It seems like a pretty hefty jump from your normal Char Broil cheapo. 
     
  3. glocksrock

    glocksrock Smoking Fanatic

    I doubt you would have any warping, but temp control would be the main concern. If you are cooking for just a small amount of people the wrangler will be fine, but it's easy to fill it up quickly. You can always sell it if you don't like what you get, that's what I did. After using the wrangler I found it to be a bit small, and I wanted a reverse flow smoker, so I sold it and got a Lang since I found a killer deal on a slightly used on on craigslist. I was able to sell the wrangler for what I paid for it.

    Of course if you have extra money to spend, just ge tthe Brazos model which is a bit bigger than the pecos, but has 1/4 in. steel, but of course it costs twice as much as the wrangler, but it's really nice.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2014
  4. I now have this smoker and I can attest it has been quite a surprise to use.  It holds temp well and is very easy to bring to temp. I'm glad I spent the money on it.
     
  5. When I close my damper on the firebox my temps rise? I can't get them to come down.
     
  6. I just started playing with he exhaust damper too. It's coming down but definitely making more white smoke and not the tbs
     
  7. joshdaddyjoe

    joshdaddyjoe Newbie

    I found that is I leave the Intake door open at the begininning of the cook It is easier for me to control the temp when it gets to hot. Once you reach your desired temp close the intake door and adjust as necessary.


    I learned a lot from the article on stick burning. Basic rules at the bottom follow them and after some practice it will only get easier.

    http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/a/stickburning101
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2014
  8. joshdaddyjoe

    joshdaddyjoe Newbie

    Double post
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2014
  9. Are you talking about the side door of the firebox and not the damper that is adjustable?
     
  10. joshdaddyjoe

    joshdaddyjoe Newbie

    Yes, I leave the side door to the firebox open. Usually I will bring my smoker to 300* then add the ribs etc and close the door and adjust the inlet damper.

    I apologize for not being more clear.
     
  11. thanks joe, well it looks like not having to babysit this type of smoker is harder due to its size? guess i have to split my splits smaller after reading stick burning 101 and letting it warm on top of my fire box. if i were to add a bunch of 1-1.5 inch diameter sticks in there so i could walk away for a couple hours it might spike the temps and i cant add a bigger thick split because it doesnt produce clean smoke until awhile later. ill keep on playing around. but if anyone knows a better way to be able to get it to stay for an hour or more and i can walk away let me know. 
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2014
  12. johnb26

    johnb26 Newbie

    :grilling_smilie:I can't wait to get my new wrangler.
     
  13. johnb26

    johnb26 Newbie

    I know that the wrangler smoker is 1/8" thick steel body but I was wondering will this steel ever warp over time or burn out, or hold heat well compared to more expensive 1/4" steel smokers. I'm on a tight budget and the wrangler is all I can afford with a thicker metal than my first charbroil offset thin sheet metal smoker I'm hoping I made a good choice with this wrangler smoker. Any advice please.
     
  14. mickhlr

    mickhlr Smoke Blower

    Johnb26, the Wrangler is 3/16" steel. The Pecos is 1/8".
     
  15. roger46

    roger46 Newbie

    I became the proud owner of Old Country Ranch Hand smoker on my birthday.   I have yet to see any reviews on this name.  I liked your review and suggestions.  I did have question about the baffles you made to divert the heat.  The time I've used mine the heat is really intense the closer to the fire box which is only natural.  This really comes into play when you are smoking a lot of meat and the grill is full.  How do you figure the sixe of the plates and how do you install them?  Thank for a relpy.
     
  16. koch

    koch Newbie

    Hello, I am looking to purchase a Wrangle also. I was wondering if it would fit in the back of an SUV. Can someone please provide the length, height, and width of the wrangler? Or are Academy's specs golden?
     
  17. I don't think it will fit. It's pretty tall. I used my avalanche.
    Height 55 inch
    Width 24 inch
    Depth 56 inch
    Weight 225 lb

    According to academy
     
  18. koch

    koch Newbie

    I was wondering if I could lay it down and slide it in.. Hm.. it's gonna be an interesting trip. Thanks Fisher!
     
  19. jcrevz

    jcrevz Fire Starter

    I also had major major issues getting temps to hold steady. It was either blazing and 400* or choke the fire, and billows of white smoke. BUT after a couple times using and experimenting, I found that if I build the fire all the way to the right of the firebox, instead of the middle or closer to the inlet to the smoke box, WAY easier to control. Night and day. It was pissing me off, watching all these videos of people just cracking/closing the butterfly damper and raising/dropping temps like it was nothing. 

    I use 9" splits, throw a new split on when i notice temps dropping and 10* or lower than desired. 

    Using this method, i rarely get temp swings, +/- 10* either way. And beautiful TBS. 
     
  20. jcrevz

    jcrevz Fire Starter

    good luck! - it took myself and 2 employees to get it up in the back of my nissan frontier, and i have it dropped 4" with sport suspension. thing is HEAVY
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2014

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