My first caseless snack sticks

Discussion in 'Sausage' started by fratthewcraig, Mar 4, 2015.

  1. fratthewcraig

    fratthewcraig Fire Starter

    I picked up a landsman electric smoker and wanted to try some caseless snack sticks.  Mixed 2 pounds of beef 80/20 with hi mtn cracked pepper and garlic processing kit.  Let that bond overnight and loaded it up with a jerky gun i got from gander mtn.  last night i noticed the tray it came with was too large for the smoker but nothing the sawzaw couldnt fix.  I plan on welding the edge back on with 50/50 solder.  Is that safe to smoke with? i got the sticks in there now on 137 for the next few hours than bumb it up slowly.  will get pics up soon.  want to start getting into making stuff with casings but i gotta get a stuffer first. any tips/tricks would be appreciated
     
  2. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    If that's 50/50 lead/tin.... I would skip it..... try something like high temp silicone.... It's probably the same thing they make kitchen utensils out of... or epoxy...
     
  3. fratthewcraig

    fratthewcraig Fire Starter

    Hmm i never throught about using silicone or epoxy.  i snipped al the way through with wire cutters so now the ends are a little bit frayed and crazy so i want to reattach them to the sturdy metal side i cut off.  I will stay away from 50/50 if its not healthy to breath in. what about lead free solder?
     
  4. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Will lead free solder stick to steel.... I'm not sure.... It also has a low melting point...... brazing may be the ticket... or welding... or pop rivet...


    Soft solder is typically thought of when solder or soldering is mentioned, with a typical melting range of 90 to 450 °C (190 to 840 °F).[3] It is commonly used in electronics, plumbing, and assembly of sheet metal parts. Manual soldering uses a soldering iron or soldering gun. Alloys that melt between 180 and 190 °C (360 and 370 °F) are the most commonly used. Soldering performed using alloys with a melting point above 450 °C (840 °F) is called 'hard soldering', 'silver soldering', or brazing.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2015
  5. fratthewcraig

    fratthewcraig Fire Starter

    ah i see.  All my soldering exp comes from doing plumbing soldering.  so you think it will not stick to the trays
     
  6. fratthewcraig

    fratthewcraig Fire Starter

    they came out a little crispy, ran them a little to high because couldnt get my smoker producing good smoke at a low temp.  also dont have a dehydrator so that makes them come out a little more wet
     

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