High temp method for smoked prime rib

Discussion in 'Beef' started by smokyokie, Oct 25, 2006.

  1. smokyokie

    smokyokie Smoking Fanatic

    There used to be a steak house/BBQ joint in Fayetteville, Ark. called Coy's. They had they absolute best hickory smoked prime rib. I managed to get out of them that they used a high temp method where they got the smoker stoked way hot, put the meat on and then shut the door and let it alone.

    I've been wanting to duplicate this method, but I don't want to experiment w/ $50 pieces of meat.

    Does anyone have any experience in this method?

    As a matter of fact, a guy in S.E Okla that's nationally famous cooks rib sections of pork loin the same way.

    Can I get any input?
     
  2. Hey Dickeydoo,
    A friend of mine does this. I don't know if he does does it the same way as the Qjoint that you mentioned though. He builds a fire in the fire box with what ever smokin' wood he is using, then lights a bed of charcoal in the bottom of the smoke chamber. I would guess that the thin blue smoke here is of little importance because the idea is to get a smokey flavor and get the meat done in a timely fashion so it's ready to serve. Again, this part is just a guess.
    I have never watched my buddy cook this, I have just eaten it. It's what he does for dinner every Super Bowl Sunday. I have a bad habbit of showing up late. But it doesn't matter as long I get there in time to eat. [​IMG]
     
  3. CORRECTION

    I called my buddy and he said he just lit a bed of coals and put the hickory on top, let the smoke roll. He says the idea is to "kiss" the meat with smoke and cook the steak. He says you can do the same thing on a grill if there's enough room.
    I don't know if this is what you are talking about or not.
     
  4. joed617

    joed617 Smoking Fanatic OTBS Member

    Hey DDBBQ, I've done a prime rib on my weber with the rotisserie and used wood chunks.. I piled the coals on eact side of the weber so there no coals directly under the meat added a few chunks and placed the lid on and away it went... a good temp is 350 to 375deg to roast at, basicly the same temp as you would do a roast in your oven only your doing it outside with charcoal and wood chunks.. I just season the roast with salt, pepper and garlic granuales. Hope this helps you.

    Joe
     
  5. dutch

    dutch Smoking Guru Staff Member Administrator Group Lead OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Just what I was going to suggest, JoeD.

    DDBBQ, follow Joe's suggestion and cook that Rib roast to your desired doness. I personally like to get a standing rib roast that is cut from the small end of the rib primal. The smaller end will cook to the doness that the wife and kids like while the larger end cooks to a nice Med. rare. . just the way I like it!! You can also place a oven proof baking dish or an aluminum pan under the roast and catch the juices to make an au jus to serve with the roast.
     
  6. smokyokie

    smokyokie Smoking Fanatic

    :D Thanx for all the input fellas, but what I'm really looking for is the beginning temp for the high temp, then off method. Please keep your ears to the ground for me if you happen to hear any rumblings on the subject.

    And, I'm w/you Dutch, bone in makes a better roast!
     
  7. joed617

    joed617 Smoking Fanatic OTBS Member

    Hey DDBBQ, I get ya now.. My mom use to cook a roast in the oven so maybe you could do the same on a smoker as long as it's insulated enough. She would set the oven temp to 500deg, cook it 7 to 8 minutes per lb and then shut the oven off for an hour. I don't know how this would work in a smoker .. I hope this helps some .

    Joe
     
  8. smokyokie

    smokyokie Smoking Fanatic

    :idea: There ya go! In the indoor oven, we do 10 min. @ 475* then down to 225*, then rest @150*(as low as you can set it).

    My smoker is configured much the same as Coy's was, so I'm pretty sure that they would've had to have built about the same size fire in theirs as I would in mine to achieve the same initial temp (whatever temp that is).
    So I figure that if I could find out what temp they started at, I could start mine @ the same temp, cook the rib for the same amount of time, and yeild the same result. It was consistantly wonderful, just the right amount of smoke, tender like filet of veal, juicyas 18 year old...whoops :oops: Anyway, it was good.
     
  9. jminion

    jminion Meat Mopper OTBS Member

    I smoke prime Rib or Rib Eyes at 350 to 375 untill they reach 125 internal and then let it rest for about 30 to 45 min. Med rare center and some a little more done on the ends to make those sick folks that want it more done happy.
    Jim
     
  10. smokyokie

    smokyokie Smoking Fanatic

    We have found that longer resting times @ 150* conditions the meat exceptionally well. We picked up that tip from a friend who learned it while working @ a famous KC restaurant ( due to my senior status, I'm unable to recall which one).
     
  11. joed617

    joed617 Smoking Fanatic OTBS Member

    I can't recall ever having a senior moment .. laugh
     
  12. smokyokie

    smokyokie Smoking Fanatic

    Now...., what was I going to say?
     
  13. I don't know if any of you are fans of Good Eats, but Alton did a wonderful show years ago on the Prime Rib. If I recall correctly he preferred to actually cook it slow and then do the crust at the end. It was backwards from what I'm used to, but looked good. I'll try to dig it up. Obviously, this would be much harder to do in a smoker as its far easier to build a hot fire and let it die down than to run constant then suddenly increase the temp to 500F.

    Chris Green
     
  14. smokyokie

    smokyokie Smoking Fanatic

    If I haven't already said it, Welcome to the board!

    I'm a fan of AB's, but there've been times when I just gotta disagree w/ him. That show was one. You want the muscle to relax as slowly as possible to retain the juices, and crankin up the fire @ the can't be the best way. In fact, I believe that the reason this method produces such good results is the fact that the muscle begins relaxing all the way through the cooking process.
     

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