Had a general question

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by theundadog904, Sep 6, 2013.

  1. When smoking meats, is it true that wood should only be used in the first half of the total cooking time?
     
  2. pineywoods

    pineywoods Smoking Guru Staff Member Administrator Group Lead SMF Premier Member

    That would be false. Use smoke as long as you want
     
  3. radio

    radio Smoking Fanatic

    If it's true, then I have a huge problem 'cause I cook in a stick burner[​IMG]

    Some say meat will not absorb smoke for more than 4 hours or so and you can quit adding chips/chunks to a charcoal smoker.  The smoke ring is over half an inch deep on my last Brisky.  One more reason I'm glad I graduated to a SFB stick burner

     
  4. pineywoods

    pineywoods Smoking Guru Staff Member Administrator Group Lead SMF Premier Member

    Those people would be wrong the meat will continue to take in smoke but the smoke ring stops forming . Nice looking brisket
     
  5. Ok cool, trying my luck with a 5 1/2 Boston butt tomorrow and was wondering. Thanks a lot!
     
  6. pineywoods

    pineywoods Smoking Guru Staff Member Administrator Group Lead SMF Premier Member

    If you foil then you don't need to apply smoke during that but the rest of the time I would add smoke
     
  7. I think it depends what your doing.  When foiled, the meat gets the heat, not the smoke.  If you have other things in there smoking, who cares if say your doing a 3 - 2 - 1 smoke on some ribs, you get to the foil part and while in the un-foiled part you added a brisket at the 1 hour mark, you still would need smoke while the ribs are foiled.  The hard known fact is above 140 degrees, the meat will take any more smoke.

    http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/137096/when-does-meat-accept-smoke-the-best
     
  8. gmc2003

    gmc2003 Smoking Fanatic

    It also depends on how strong a smokey taste you want.

    Chris
     
  9. dburne

    dburne Meat Mopper

    On my very first smoke - spare ribs - I used hickory wood chunks on top of my burning charcoal, throughout the whole smoke.

    My wife thought they were too smokey tasting, so the next time I only used the wood lumps for like the first couple of hours or so.

    She liked them much better that time, still have a smoke flavor but not a real strong one. So I have adapted to doing them that way now.

    I think it is just a matter of individual  personal preference, for the particular kind of meat being smoked, and the particular kind of wood being used along with type - pellets - chips - lumps - splits.

    Experimentation is probably best way to determine.
     
  10. chef jimmyj

    chef jimmyj Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member

    It's a personal choice but making that perfect Thin Blue Smoke should give good flavor without bitterness. I am one of those that believe, " It's a Smoker! If there is meat in the chamber you should be making Smoke." I use an AMNPS and have yet to get anywhere near what my family would say is too much smoke,even on a 14 hour Butt no foil...JJ
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2013

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