Getting Started in the Mountains

Discussion in 'Small Spaces' started by disco, May 8, 2014.

  1. disco

    disco Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Normally we would have our seedlings ready to go out under protection soon but we took a trip out of the country for 2 weeks and didn't do any seedling. When we left the middle of April there was still patches of snow in our yard, the garlic I planted last fall was still under frozen ground and we had one lonely crocus.

    On my return, the best news was the garlic was up six inches!


    She Who Must Be Obeyed was more impressed with the spring flowers.









    Since our return, I have been able to turn 4 beds and plant the first spinach, lettuce and pea seeds. Green onion seed will go in tomorrow and I have purchased Manitoba tomato plants which will go out under cover soon.

    It feels good to play in the dirt again.

    Disco
     
  2. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Looks good Disco... Especially the GAAAAAAARLIC.....
     
  3. disco

    disco Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Thanks, Dave. I bow to you as the garlic master though.

    [​IMG]

    I am excited about one variety I planted this year. It is called Polish Garlic and is really large cloves but is a true garlic not an elephant garlic. I tried it at the Falls Garlic Festival. They had it roasted and squeezed for garlic bread and they got way more per head than I do when I roast regular size cloved garlic.

    You have any experience with it?

    Disco
     
  4. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Nope.... but I planted 3 new varieties last fall.... Lithuanian and a Montana Zemo or something like that.... and one other..... I'd have to go read my files.....
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2014
  5. disco

    disco Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Last year, a friend of mine wanted to start growing garlic. He was just going to go to the local nursery where they have one kind of garlic of unidentified type but it was an Italian type. I suggested he might want to look at some other varieties. He asked if there was that much difference.

    We had a garlic tasting. I fried up a slice of each of the 5 varieties I grew last year and one from the supermarket. Then we tried a slice of each raw. He was amazed at the differences and chose Red Russian and Yugo for his first efforts.

    I envy your ability to grow even more great varieties. I allow myself to try one or two new varieties a year but myself and the missus just don't need that much.

    Disco
     

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