COld smoking Ideal box temp and humidity for cheese and meats

Discussion in 'Info and Practices' started by four20, Mar 1, 2016.

  1. What is the ideal temp and humidity for cold smoking?
     
  2. smokeymose

    smokeymose Master of the Pit

    Good question, Four!
    I wouldn't think it should be below freezing temps. Other than keeping cheese below 50 or 60, I don't know about meats. I've never thought about humidity in smoking.
    Maybe someone will chip in some info. I'm curious....
     
  3. c farmer

    c farmer Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    According to the book I have is says 52-71.

    Nothing about humidity, I would think low, we dry our meats in the fridge to get the surface dry to get good tasting smoke. High humidity would defeat the purpose
     
  4. chef jimmyj

    chef jimmyj Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member

    That depends on WHAT you are cold smoking...Cheese and Belly Bacon, 50-70°F is optimum...BUT...Cold, actually Cool smoking Canadian Bacon, Hams, Hocks and Cured Smoked Sausage like Kielbasa, then starting at 120°F and bumping 10° every hour until you get to 170°F and then hold the temp there until the IT of the meat reaches 145 to 155°F, depending on what you are making. Humidity only plays a big role when Dry Curing meat like Coppa, Prosciutto, Salami and such...JJ
     
  5. Well I want to do a dry cured ham. I would like to convert a wine reefer into a curing cabinet that would allow the same control while smoking. It is designed to hold wine between 38 f - 52 f at 37%-43% humidity. So I am focusing on curing chamber that also smokes.

    Building the chamber is easier said than knowing what conditions I need to adjust to the cuts I can obtain.
     
  6. chef jimmyj

    chef jimmyj Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member

    Last edited: Mar 2, 2016
  7. I remember reading that thread at Christmas when I bought a country ham to smoke. I love reading it. Its why I really want to do a prosciutto, but here in the south I would have to artificially create the environment.
     
  8. chef jimmyj

    chef jimmyj Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member

    Do a little research. While the Northern style like Parma is sweet and prized, there are Southern style Prosciutti that are saltier to inhibit spoilage in the Warmer Climate. You should have little trouble making them and these are similar to American Country Ham, just without the Smoke...JJ
     

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