Brisket cutting question

Discussion in 'Beef' started by va_connoisseur, May 14, 2010.

  1. I have two 13 pound packers that I need to prep for the smoker. I went to cut off the fat and well let's just say I ended up hacking off more meat than I wanted.

    Can someone recommend a knife or type of knife that is better suited for the job. Would a boning knife be better?
     
  2. eman

    eman Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member

    not knowing what knife you are using now , All i can say is i use a large filet knife.
     
  3. bbqhead

    bbqhead Smoking Fanatic

    a good filet or boning knife works well. I prefer forshiner brand.
     
  4. erain

    erain Master of the Pit OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    a sharp one bud, whether its a foreshner sp... or a fillet knife, its the sharpness that counts not the brand. a good quality knife will hold an edge longer though. personally i use a fillet knife as i dont have any real good quality knives except a few hunting knives.
     
  5. pops6927

    pops6927 Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    As a meatcutter, I'd recommend a good boning knife. Along with a good knife is keeping it sharp; I'd recommend a good steel and a good sharpener too. I use:

    6" boning knife:

    http://www.acemart.com/prod4530.html

    or

    http://www.acemart.com/prod9949.html

    steel:

    http://www.acemart.com/prod9714.html

    or

    http://www.acemart.com/prod4524.html

    sharpener:

    http://www.acemart.com/prod4557.html

    or

    http://www.acemart.com/prod4556.html

    I also use a Chefs Choice electric sharpener too, but still love to bring out the oilstone when I have time and redress the edge!

    Of course you can shop around and find the same type of products in a thousand places and probably a thousand different prices; but AceMart offers good quality at a reasonable price so I thought I'd give you a start there.

    On a good knife, you create a 'burr' on the edge when sharpening. This burr will bend to the left or right; the steel 'sets up' the burr so it's straight and gives maximum sharpness. A few good strokes on a steel can make all the difference in the world. Once the burr has been worn down, then it's time to put it on the stone and sharpen it again.
     
  6. Thanks for the help. I was using a 10" kitchen knife. Gotta get the right tool to do the job right
     

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