Brisket Cut Question

Discussion in 'Beef' started by jeffed76, Aug 23, 2013.

  1. jeffed76

    jeffed76 Meat Mopper

    I found a great price for brisket at my local Wally-world, but it was called something strange like "packer's cut." Anybody know what that means? It was less than $3 a pound. Did I miss out?
     
  2. smokngun

    smokngun Smoke Blower

    No you did good, a packers cut is a "less processed" cut meaning they do minimal cutting on it i.e. the point and flat are both there and the fat cap is intact. I saw a flat yesterday at Safeway and it was trimmed of the fat cap, it was $4.99 lb. The flat is what you see typically served at BBQ joints sliced and the point is what is commonly referred to as burnt ends.
     
  3. geerock

    geerock Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

    You done good. Lots of places will separate the more desired point and try to convince you that the flat is the prime piece and jack the price. Like what Smokngun explained. Now you can make burnt ends out of that point if you like but there are those of us that consider that a sin. Hell, in Texas they can still hang you for that. Packer briskets are the way to go.
     
  4. jeffed76

    jeffed76 Meat Mopper

    I'm a brisket nube, so just to make sure... Packer's cut = good. Looks like I'll be looking up brisket trimming vids tonight :)
     
  5. geerock

    geerock Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

    Don't go too crazy with trimming. Basically aboutcan eighth to quarter inch fat cap is good. On a packer you can cut out the hard strip between the flat and point. You'll find that the remaining fat cap after smoking will scrape off easily with a knife edge. Lots of times I don't trim at all.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2013
  6. jeffed76

    jeffed76 Meat Mopper

    that's my kind of prep LOL! I may not make it to pit masters but as long as the family I happy I'm good :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2013
  7. smokngun

    smokngun Smoke Blower

    As with the others I do minimal trimming if any, when it comes to a rub personally I base it kinda like a steak. When you eat a steak you typically don't look for sweet like you might with pork. I usually use a very basic rub of salt, garlic powder, pepper, onion powder. Something like a Montreal seasoning works very well. Just some ideas.
     
  8. jeffed76

    jeffed76 Meat Mopper

    Thanks for the tips! I can't wait to try my first brisket! I'm a Montreal fan, so I'll probably try that for my first one like you said SmokmGun.
     
  9. seenred

    seenred Smoking Guru Group Lead OTBS Member

    Good luck with that brisket, Jeff, and be sure to show and tell how it goes with some Qview!

    Red
     
  10. Glad I found this and thanks for the post!! Doing my first brisket this weekend and had the same issue fitting it into my MES 30"

    Smart & Final label shows where to cut the slab. Since it's just the two of us...may have to freeze the point and smoke the flat. 1.5-2 hrs/lbs I'd guess is still the rule at 235-240ish?
     
  11. dieselaw

    dieselaw Fire Starter

    Yeah, that is the general rule. I just cooked my first brisket flat and it was right at 1.5 hrs per pound. My only tip....start early . That way u can be patient with the meat, track how the meat warms up, and take your time getting to your target IT. Mine was hard at 190 and almost like butter at 200. If u finish a little early you can pull it off the smoker, wrap it in foil, wrap it in a couple towels and let it rest in a cooler. Mine only dropped 8 degrees in one hour while in the cooler, so u can see that they can rest for a little while. Good luck!
     

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