better question about bbb?

Discussion in 'Curing' started by tc fish bum, Mar 28, 2014.

  1. tc fish bum

    tc fish bum Meat Mopper

    I use cure #2  often. my pappy is from Kentucky and they are realllllly particular about how a good ham is made. not to mention hes been doing it since the 50s. im comphy with #2. but this tender quick thing vs cure#1 rub vs brine is there a difference? do I look for weight/h20 loss like on slow cure. im gonna get 2 big ol shoulders quarter them and do both rub and pops brine just cause this is new[ and fun] to me. one half of one shoulder will also get turned into tasso, thank you foamheart, as well .does anyone have a preference? or is this half dozen vs 6. either way ill post pics and blind taste test my people just to see  .they hate it when I do that. lol
     
  2. foamheart

    foamheart Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    I am not a cure guru, Dave, Pop, Bear, Smokin, etc. there is loads of them here though. My limited understanding is......

    Cure # 1 is for fast cures, I use it in Pop's Brine cure

    TQ is for fast curing, it can be used dry or in a brine. It contains Nitrate and nitrite. where I would use it probably is around bones to prevent bone sour.

    The cure #2 or Sugar cures (or that is what my Pop called 'em), are for long term curing like a country ham.

    Caution cures improperly applied can seriously hurt you. If you start with a recipe, stay with that recipe. You can't mix and match.

    Probably your Dad like mine never saw a Cure #1, everything was a sugar cure with #2. It was used when trying to keep meats without refrigeration. The salt or sugar dehydrated the meat by removing the liquids and replacing it with a salt. This deters bacterial, and the smoke hopefully deters the critters.

    And if you want a little confusion added in........... Seriously, the real scoop on the cures.

    http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/a/curing-salts-for-sausage-making

    Hope it helps.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2014

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