Anyone Dry Age Beef?

Discussion in 'Beef' started by flbobecu, Jul 7, 2010.

  1. flbobecu

    flbobecu Smoking Fanatic

    Just curious if anyone here does. 

    Found a STUPID cheap price on some USDA Prime, rib eyes, and I might want to take a chance at aging a sub-primal. 
     
  2. sumosmoke

    sumosmoke Master of the Pit OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

  3. mballi3011

    mballi3011 Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    [​IMG]

    Now I have always wanted to learn how to but I haven't as of yet. Theres a thread about this.

    http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/forum/thread/76324   Try this one it talks about some bags that you can buy to make dry aged beef. So maybe you can find them and give them a try. IF not maybe you need to get with Pops or Bbally I think they know something about this subject too. I'm sure that they will set you straight.
     
  4. flbobecu

    flbobecu Smoking Fanatic

    Thanks guys.
     
  5. bbally

    bbally Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Dry aging in a cyrovac does nothing.

    Dry aging in a home refrigerator only dries out the meat.  You don't have the proper bacteria to really dry age.  Dehydrating the meat does change the way it will taste because it alters the maillard reaction.  But it is not the same as a beef steak from a dry aging butcher.  And it really needs to be done on the rail, not as a steak sitting on a shelf.
     
  6. flbobecu

    flbobecu Smoking Fanatic

    I think a search on google may reveal a lot more than you think. With a special aging bag, it can be done. 

    Check it out:

    http://www.drybagsteak.com/

    They have some videos too. 

    I cannot afford a "dry aged" Prime Ribeye from our local butcher. He wants $23/lb. I paid $7.99/lb (for a subprimal) for Prime Ribeyes. 

    [​IMG]
     
  7. bbally

    bbally Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    No.. it just reveals proper marketing can sell stuff to people.

    This is the way we age the beef we raise.  24 to 28 days depending on bac-T counts. 

    [​IMG]

    The marketing gimmicks and talking heads can all publish anything they want to publish.  But in the end you are just dehydrating the meat.  Though I will grant that the bag prevents mold spores from getting on the meat.  At least it did when I was sent them to test.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2010
  8. flbobecu

    flbobecu Smoking Fanatic

    Huh. Maybe you should do a little research next time my friend. This isn't "snake oil" stuff... There's a couple of ways to do it - many find using these bags, is more convenient. 

    Maybe you'd like to come over and have a steak with me.. 

    *cheers*
     
  9. bbally

    bbally Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Been handling beef longer than most, I am sure of my position.  But one persons snake oil is anothers truth.  Welcome to do what you want of course, I just want to make sure the science side is supplied to the people, not the marketing side.

    I will grant you that dehydrating beef makes it taste different when cooked.  As I explained in prior posts dried out beef creates a large area of completed Maillard reaction when cooked.  This gives the beef a more gamey taste to it.

    But dry aging it is not, one only need to do a horseblood petri dish smear and incubate for three days to prove the lack of protien transitioning to Amino Acid to prove the bac-T and enzymatic action are missing.

    The reason they are missing is the packing houses go out of their way to arrest all the actions to create long shelf life.  And to create a piece of beef that is the wrong color when it is sold. (That being bright red meat) Oxygen will oxidize red blood sells in 10 minutes, since they are red when oxyginated and brownish gray when oxydized real butcher meat is gray.  But marketing shows consumers pay for and select meat when it is red in color not gray.  Hence the Cyrovac and other Low Oxygen methods of packaging created not for flavor, but for color so auntie May will chose it in the store cold display.

    Anyway I know plenty about aging beef and I know what home dry aging the myth is, and it is generally the same thing coming out of the south end of my north bound bulls, here on the ranch in Colorado.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2010
  10. flbobecu

    flbobecu Smoking Fanatic

    Huh, good stuff. Interesting. Appreciate it.

    Got put in my place.. I guess.. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2010
  11. sporty

    sporty Fire Starter

    Interesting tidbit -

    "A nationally known butcher named Merle Ellis discovered a technique for dry aging beef at home."

     
  12. bbally

    bbally Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    I was not putting you or anyone in any place.

    I only disseminate information.  I only wish to add to the information the people select from, my information is science based.
     
     
  13. bbally

    bbally Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Here is one on 9/11 being a government inside job:

    http://www.serendipity.li/wot/911_a_hoax.htm

    In print on the internet does not "a proof it is real fact", create!
     
     
  14. flbobecu

    flbobecu Smoking Fanatic

    I try, whenever researching, to gather as much info as I possibly can. Its not that I didn't select pieces from here and there - it seems most info is about the same, regarding this topic. 
     
  15. bbally

    bbally Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Then do not reject my information without gathering more about the true method of dry aginf.  Add it to your list and investigate somemore, but start by using scientific papers instead of marketing information, it will help you with the science side verses the conjecture and product marketing side.

    As I said I am putting out the information for people to evaluate, I have no dog in the fight as people leaving meat lay in a reefer for several days makes no difference to me.  But they ought to have my information to evaluate when deciding what they are going to do.  They can also reject it as I am not wired to win a fake dog fight, I just want people to be able to read my information as I have been aging beef legally for just over 25 years now.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2010
  16. sporty

    sporty Fire Starter

    Quote:Originally Posted by bbally  [​IMG]





    Here is one on 9/11 being a government inside job:

    http://www.serendipity.li/wot/911_a_hoax.htm

    In print on the internet does not "a proof it is real fact", create!

    Just as I am reading your print.  I actually read about Merle Ellis some time ago.  I simply used the internet to find a reference. 
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2010
  17. ryan h

    ryan h Newbie

    I have aged to 24, 40, and 55 days recently. I found that a 24 day aged steak... is a steak. If anyone can tell much difference, it's in their head. At 40 days things get a little more flavorful and tender but again, it's just a good steak. At 55 day it's a whole new experience in beef flavor but there is a lot more to cut away and the loss is much more, but what an amazing flavor! Never had any off flavors or "funk" as they often call it. I kept temp between 35-37 and humidity was anywhere from 60-80% (more humidity at first obviously till a crust started to form).   We started a FB page recently. We are not professionals but have gotten AMAZING results. https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dry-Aging-Beef-Chronicles/750101315058940?sk=timeline
     

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